Grand Daddy Yellowstone

Falls at Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

Established in 1872 as the first National Park in America, Yellowstone is the Grand Daddy of our national parks. It is interesting to note that not only is it the first in America, it is the first National Park in the world. It is good to be known as a trendsetter for something like this….setting aside land for conservation, recreation and preservation for future generations. It is an amazing place to visit not only for the historical significance, but the diversity in the features of the park. Yellowstone is quite a popular destination: it hosted 4.12 million visitors in 2018. That sounds like alot…but it is a huge park, plus it is not all summertime attendance. Some  folks visit for winter adventures, but the most popular times are July and August.  A visit to Yellowstone provides a variety of experiences to make it well worth the trip. Included in that list of things to see at the park include: erupting geysers, bubbling hot springs, prismatic reflecting pools, waterfalls and an abundance of readily visible wildlife. All these amazing features are found within this large park of  3,472 square miles.  For some perspective, that’s more than three times the size of Rhode Island.

Old Faithful…just like clockwork.

Probably one of the most fondly known features of the part is Old Faithful geyser. Like clockwork, it erupts about every 90 minutes. Old Faithful and the many geysers and hot springs serve as a reminder of the unstable nature and changing geology of our planet: especially near Yellowstone.  Also near Old Faithful is a terrific Visitor Information center with all kinds of nifty information about the geyser basin region.

Grand Prismatic Spring (photo:trendbuzzer.com)

Just north of Old Faithful are the beautiful prismatic springs and waterfalls. A boardwalk stroll through the various springs gives you a nice view and it’s beneficial to try several different viewpoints. One of the most amazing and colorful is the Grand Prismatic Spring. It is the largest in the Park: at 370 feet wide, and stunning to view. The bright colors are caused by different types of bacteria and algae that thrive with the different water temperatures. One has to try several different angles before viewing, and photographing, all the spectacular colors.  If you have a drone for aerial views…this would be an awesome place to try it out.

Woodland critters @ the Park: to this day I’m not exactly sure what these fellows were, badgers?

The wildlife are so accustomed to park visitors; frequently they wander close enough so you can get some awesome photos.  Of course that has been known to cause problems, if you don’t respect their space and use common sense. They are wild animals after all.  When we were near one of the visitor’s centers, there was a very large heard of Elk that decided to hang out and take an afternoon siesta under the shade of a spreading Oak. They are beautiful graceful creatures and several were mothers with young ones to protect. Photos could easily be taken from a safe distance. Several rangers had carefully arranged some barricades by the sidewalk directly across from the Elk….to keep both the tourists and the Elks safe. As you can image, “there’s one in every crowd” : some idiot walked over the barricade with camera in hand trying to get much closer for a “great shot.” Luckily he did not get too far before the ranger called out to him. Apparently, he felt he was exempt from following the guidelines put in place by the Park…he just ignored the ranger and kept walking closer. He waved off the ranger who then, justifiably so, got angry. Nevertheless, the ranger’s professionalism and manner in handling this incident was incredible. He “hit” him (the inconsiderate tourist) where it hurts: his wallet. The ranger firmly said that if he did not step away he would fine the man $500 for not adhering to Park regulations and disobeying the instructions of a Park Ranger. The Elk photographer did back down and I am sure the ranger was relieved that no further action was necessary. The rangers are there just to protect the beauty and sanctity of the Park, the Park wildlife and to assist visitors in the Park to have a wonderful Park experience.  I give all those rangers so much credit; they do incredible work. I have never met a ranger I didn’t like: they are all so incredibly helpful and they have a wealth of information about the Parks they serve. Never be afraid to ask questions, they are happy to help!

“Bison Jam” @ Yellowstone

On a lighter note about wildlife viewing is a critter you are almost destined to see: the Bison.  Yellowstone is famous for its roaming herds of bison.  Like many visitors to Yellowstone we were wondering: “What’s the difference between a buffalo and a bison?” We wanted to make sure we used the right verbage for theses amazing, massive creatures that you see frequently all around the Park. Actually bison are the creatures found roaming the American west, not buffalo. Varieties of buffalo are found in South Asia and Africa.  A major difference is the presence of a hump. Bison have one at the shoulders while buffalo don’t.  Buffalo’s horns tend to be quite long, bison’s horn are shorter. Even with all these differences, it’s easy to get mixed up and call them buffalo. Common usage I guess from all those old cowboy Western movies. In Yellowstone, a frequent occurrence on the road ways is the Bison Jam. Bison, of course, have the right of way and when they want to cross the road, you better let them….at their own pace. We had the excitement of seeing this first hand and you can get some great photos…safe photos…if you use caution and obviously stay in your vehicle.

Heading out west? Be sure to stop at the Grand Daddy of them all:Yellowstone National Park. Put your traveling shoes on. JES

Creek by the Shoshone Lodge, near East entrance to Yellowstone
The Author, Julie, at Yellowstone National Park

 

NPS Inspiration

Just published in January 2019: “The Centennial, A Journey through America’s National Park System by David Kroese

Yes, I am inspired by the National Park Service; the Parks, the seashores, the monuments, the historical sites….the whole package. People who know me,  know that I have a very keen interest in the National Parks and my passion for the parks really grew during the 2016 Centennial of the NPS.  Yet, last night it was refreshing and exciting to find that a person I don’t even know was also inspired by the 2016 Centennial of the NPS; so inspired that he wrote a book about it and his extensive travels.  WOW, looks really cool and also an inspiration to me. I keep blogging away about the parks, but am also starting a book about the National Park Service. The book is in it’s infancy stage at this point, but seeing something like this book inspires me to keep plugging.

Also, as a note to my regular readers and friends, I have made several updates to my travel blog that I hope will make it more “user friendly”. I hope to inspire others to comment and learn from each other in the travel community about amazing places in the USA. I also recently changed the name to:http://americantrekkerblog.com

I believe that “American Trekker” is more representative of what the blog is about: fantastic trips across America, and encouraging people to get out there and explore! Also, it is encouraging to know that wherever you live in this country, there is bound to be something amazing right in your own back yard. I have added a sections on my blog called “Regions”. You can click that tab and all the stories pertaining to that region will be listed, then just click on the story you want to read. Another section of my blog is : “Travel Features/Tips”, which covers everything from making the most of your National Park adventures, internet travel planning, free museums and the perils of lost luggage (yes, I imagine we all have a few stories to tell….)

I am hoping these revisions to my blog will help readers navigate their way. Be sure to enter your email if you are not already following me. You will just get email notification every time I post a blog. Thanks & Put Your traveling shoes on. JES

From the Rain Forest to the sea: Olympic National Park

Ruby Beach at Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park, located on the western edge of Washington state, showcases three distinct ecosystems: a rainforest, a wild flower meadow and a rugged Pacific shoreline. The exotic terrain and beauty of these systems are all showcased in the 1,441 square miles of this park located on the Olympic Peninsula. When visiting there, it’s a bit perplexing to understand the “boundaries” of the park because the terrain is so varied and part of the park follows the coastline of the Pacific ocean with a seemingly endless horizon.

The huge pines in the Hoh Rain forest: most of the tress are either Sitka spruce or western hemlock

The trees, almost all sitka spruce and hemlock, in this park are wondrous and their sheer size takes your breath away. Walking among these trees gives a mere human a sense of the grandeur of all creation and at the same time the fragility of our beautiful planet.  Some of the trees are hundreds of years old and can reach a height of 250 feet, with some having a circumference of 30 to 60 feet.  Going on a walk in these woods helps to give perspective on the connectivity of life, all life.  John Muir, the naturalist who was one of the men instrumental in helping to create the National Park Service said simply: “The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness.” (John Muir, 1938) It’s amazing that this is one of the few rain forests in the lower 48 states. A key feature that allows this rain forest to thrive is the abundant rain.  Precipitation in the Olympic’s rain forest ranges from 140 to 167 inches per year. Luckily, we happen to time our trip there on a sunny, warm day.

Sea Stacks near the shore at Ruby Beach

A portion of the Park borders the Pacific and boasts two beautiful beaches that stretch along the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary: Rialto Beach and Ruby Beach. Rialto Beach is further north and Ruby beach is south near the Hoh Indian Reservation. These are not the kind of beaches you park yourself on a beach blanket with a margarita in hand; they are very rocky, rugged with a ferocious surf. Nevertheless they are wonderfully scenic and you can spend hours beach combing to see amazing shells, driftwood and view the iconic “sea stacks” by the shore.  Sea stacks are steep columns of rocks formed by wave erosion. Along this particular beach, the sea stacks create quite an interesting and diverse view along the shoreline.

Driftwood at Ruby Beach

With the strength of the pounding surf, the driftwood that decorates the beach more closely resemble art sculptures in a variety of shapes.  Art inherent in nature.  This close up of one of the huge logs shows the detail and the resulting effects of wind and water.  Everywhere you look, from every angle…there’s something new to discover, and to photograph!

Skipping stones by Lake Crescent, Olympic NP

Entering the park is probably easiest from Hwy 101 by Port Angeles. The main Visitors Center is located at this entrance and the untamed beaches on the Pacific side may also be accessed from Hwy 101.  Also by 101, situated at the northernmost area of the Park, is the amazing Lake Crescent. The glacial formed lake waters reflect a beautiful azure color, have very limited algae growth and are crystal clear. Some days you can see 60 feet down into the lake that has been measured in places at 624 feet deep. The lake is the perfect environment to support several different types of trout. When we visited the lake, we didn’t have the opportunity to go fishing, however we were able to have a peaceful picnic lakeside.  Also on the lake is the historic lodge: Lake Crescent Lodge. It was built in 1915 and each of the rooms has a view of the lake. This is one of three historic Lodges found in the Park.

Olympic National Park is a gem in the Pacific northwest that definitely warrants a visit when in the area. I have only been once, but would love to visit again someday. Put your traveling shoes on. JES

The Sun Rises first at Acadia

Cadillac Mountain–Acadia National Park

On the eastern most point of the Maine coastline, atop Cadillac Mountain, is one of the places where dawn first touches the continental United States. The 1,530 foot mountain is found within Acadia National Park, established in 1919 as the first  National Park east of the Mississippi.  (Yellowstone N.P. holds the title of the first Park in the U.S.-1872)  Acadia is truly a gem on the east coast, a showcase on the Atlantic seashore that Maine residents feel such pride in sharing  with visitors to this mountainous part of the state. The park is composed of most of Mount Desert Island and tracts of land on the Schoodic Peninsula and Isle au Haut.

When my family and I visited there, that Maine hospitality and pride of their state is very apparent. My husband’s uncle has lived in Maine all his life.  He was so delighted to show us around Acadia and the nearby tourist town of Bar Harbor.  Being from the Midwest, I pronounced it with the “Rs”.  A true Maine local would say “Bah Habaw”. I probably don’t have a correct phonetic pronunciation, but you get the idea…they drop their Rs. On that trip it was a never-ending source of amusement: our Uncle and cousins laughed at the weird sound of our “Chicaawgo” accent and we laughed about Bah Habaw. Bar Harbor is Maine’s best-known tourist town, with most of Mount Desert Island’s motels, restaurants and shops located there.  As you can see on this map, Bar Harbor is right on the coast with a stunning view of the Atlantic, but is just outside the perimeter of the Park.  In addition to tourism, Maine is known for being the leader in the Lobster industry. Looking out at the water I remember seeing all the little white dots on the water and then realized that they were buoys designating where the lobster traps were set. A lobster feast in Maine is a must-do while traveling there. The map also identifies many of the incredible features of Acadia including the carriage roads.

Waiting on the next wave to come in…. Thunder Hole

Acadia is a stunning example of a beautiful plot of forested land where the mountains meet the sea. Last year, more than 3.5 million people visited Acadia National Park. Yet don’t think for a moment that it feels crowded…the 49,600 acre park affords amble opportunities to stretch your legs and take in the landscapes surrounding you. Although it is considered one of the smaller National Parks, it ranks among one of the most visited. Taking in the scenery is easy by either car or traversing the 125 miles of hiking trails. The Park Loop Road provides a wonderful sightseeing jaunt trough the park. It takes you to Sand Beach, Otter cliffs (a favorite rock climbing spot) and Thunder Hole.  At Thunder Hole, the Atlantic waves crash into a narrow chasm with such force that they create a thundering boom. When we went there, my sons were captivated, and impressed by the power of the ocean waves. Depending on the surf, and time of day, the waves rushing in can sometimes create a huge thunder effect and spray water 30 feet into the air.

One of the major attractions of Acadia is Cadillac Mountain. It is the highest peak in the eastern United States. Reaching the peak by car, is easy from a 3 1/2 mile spur off the Park Loop Road. There are also several hiking trails that end up on the mountain.  The view from the top is a fantastic one including the ocean and surrounding islands.  Any time of day is beautiful, but a few brave souls take the opportunity to see the first rays of sunlight as it hits the continental shore.

One of the stone bridges on the Carriage Roads Acadia National Park

One of the unique features of the Park are the carriage roads. From 1915 to 1940 John D. Rockefeller financed, designed and directed the construction of the carriage roads. The roads provided access to the park by horse-drawn carriages and were banned for usage by automobiles. The carriage roads still prohibit automobiles and are treasured by hikers, bikers and horseback riders. The roads include 17 hand-built granite bridges, each a beautiful addition to your travel throughout the park. The preservation of the carriage roads is also a unique tribute to John D. Rockefeller, as he was the one that donated land to the National Park Service to provide for establishment of the Park.

Bass Harbor Lighthouse

Being the lighthouse lover that I am, I would be remiss if I did not mention one of the most photographed lighthouses that happens to be in the Park at the southern most tip of Mount Desert Island: Bass Harbor Light. It sits atop a perilous looking cliff and the tower height itself is 32 feet; relatively short for lighthouse standards but it’s light extends far out into the Atlantic. The lighthouse was built in 1858, and became fully automated in 1974. Probably one of the most photographed because of its location on a majestic pine-covered cliff overlooking fantastic sunsets on the Atlantic. Definitely photo worthy.

 Acadia National Park is New England’s only National Park and a beautiful Park preserving the forested  lands and the rugged cliffs of the Atlantic seaboard. For more information you can contact: http://acadiamagic.com or the National Park Service site information at: www.nps.gov/acad/index.htm

Definitely not a Folly, Mr. Seward

Seward, Alaska~ Aerial view

Seward, Alaska is a charming city that has so many great things to offer that are quintessentially Alaskan. The city of Seward was named for President Lincoln’s Secretary of State, William Henry Seward, the man who negotiated the purchase of the state of Alaska from Russia in 1867.  Seward signed a treaty with Russia for the purchase of  Alaska for $7 million. Despite the bargain price of roughly two cents an acre, the Alaskan purchase was ridiculed in Congress and by many of the American public as “Seward’s folly,” or “Seward’s icebox,”.  After the Civil War, Seward saw the potential in the land and was an advocate of  territorial expansion. He was eager to acquire the tremendous landmass of Alaska, an area roughly one-fifth the size of the rest of the United States. The city of Seward’s official motto is: “Alaska starts Here” and certainly showcases so many of the things that Alaska has to offer.  So you may have been ridiculed at the time Mr. Seward, but you knew a good thing when you saw it…..and what a beautiful land it is!

Relatively easy to get to,  Seward is only a 2 1/2 hour drive from Anchorage on the scenic Seward Highway. The city is nestled between the mountains and the sea and has the beautiful Resurrection Bay as it’s playground. Surrounded by glaciers and landscapes that support an abundance of wildlife and fauna, the Resurrection Bay was formed by millions of years of glacial activity and is now a deep fjord 35 miles long on the southeastern coast of the Kenai Peninsula.

Kenai Fjords National Park~~ Photo from Major Marine Tours

Also found stemming from Seward is The Kenai Fjords National Park. This park was originally established as a National Monument in 1978, and became a National Park under the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980. Most access to the park is via tour boats out of Seward. Several wildlife and glacial cruises are available. Out on the water traveling along the coastline, it is a great way to see glaciers, marine mammals and seabirds. A view of the Harding Icefield, which covers over half of the acreage in the Park, is an amazing relic from the last ice age and truly takes one’s breath away. The huge fields of ice advancing between the mountain caverns and a calving glacier are amazing and can sometimes make a person feel relatively small, in the scheme of things. Nearly 40 glaciers flow from the Harding Icefield. The boat tours are worth taking the time when visiting Seward.  Exit Glacier is the only portion of the park that may be accessed by road. There are two Visitor Center’s available: one at Exit Glacier and one on Resurrection Bay in Seward. The park itself is open year round, but it’s important to note that both Visitor’s Centers, and many boat tours, have only summer operations: from May to early September.

It’s a fisherman’s paradise here and many charters are available. A good start would be a visit to The Fish House at 1303 4th Ave. They have lots of information on charters, equipment and anything and everything you need for fishing. Not only is it for fishing, it’s a pretty cool hardware store, too with a few little souvenir items. For more information check out their web site at: https://www.thefishhouse.net/  Sport Fishing in the area includes Halibut, Salmon and Rockfish.  Seward is known as one of the top five ports in Alaska for commercial fisheries.

Puffins at the Sea Life Center

The Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward is celebrating their 20th year of operation. It opened in 1998 as an educational aquarium and rehabilitative center for marine animals. It is a wonderful place to get up close and personal with marine life creatures that you normally would not have access to. They have a wonderful aviary with an array of seabirds to view. In the lower level viewing area there is an amazing tank that you can view sea lions swimming and diving right in front of you! In addition to the various fish displayed there is an octopus, who always seems to be a big hit with the spectators. Also at the Center is a “touch tank” where you can gently touch and feel what sea cucumbers and starfish actually feel like. An amazing experience, but that arctic water is REALLY cold; touch tank experiences are usually brief! Of course there is a gift shop for obtaining a souvenir of your visit. It is good to know that your purchase goes to help support the Center as both a public aquarium and the stewardship of Alaska’s marine ecosystems. I think I would be remiss, if I did not include in this discussion about the Alaska Sea Life Center, the devastating event in history that in some ways spawned the creation of this wonderful center: the Exxon Valdez oil spill of 1989.  On March 24, 1989 the Exxon Valdez supertanker spilled 10.8 million gallons of crude oil into Prince William Sound. I remember that devastating event and even today some consider it the worst man-made environmental disaster. After this disaster, years of litigation and civil settlements helped to create new wildlife rehabilitation programs in addition, of course, better regulations regarding the transportation of crude oil.  The Alaska Sea Life center was also created by collaborative efforts of local marine scientists and also Alaska legislature appropriations.  For more information on this must see destination in Seward, see their site at: http://www.alaskasealife.org

“Fog Woman” by Jennifer Headtke (part of the Raven Trilogy)

Walking around the streets of Seward you see wonderful examples of the rich heritage and artistic influence as depicted in all the murals around town.  In 2008, Seward was voted the “Mural Capitol of Alaska”  and an organization has been established to promote and maintain the artwork. The murals cover a diversity of topics including the history of Seward, commercial fishing in the area, the Iditarod trail, the natural world and the heritage of the Native Alaskans.  So when taking a walking tour of Seward, have your camera ready and your eyes open…you will see murals just about every 2 blocks.  There are several murals that I missed, guess I better go back! Also, there are at least 6 art galleries/gift shops that display wonderful artwork by Native Alaskans and art that is reflecting the Alaskan spirit.

So head down the Seward Highway and Put your traveling shoes on. JES

Clarification Please!….Park, Monument or……?

Whenever I visit a place operated by the National Park Service, it never fails….there is confusion among my fellow park goers as to if this is a “Park” or not. A recent visit to the Apostle Islands, a “national lakeshore”, prompted me to find out just where the distinctions lie in the park service classifications. It is understandable that there would be some confusion in this arena, because our National Park service manages 417 parks and sites with areas covering 84 million acres. Within the 417 sites, there are 58 of those that are classified as a “National Park”. When people think of the National Park Service, they usually think of just the “biggies”: Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon, The Great Smokey Mountains. These are fantastic places to visit, but there is so much more to the NPS than just the 58 parks. Whenever you see the arrowhead logo, you know you are in for a treat.  There are just so many things to discover and experience. So for clarification, the National Park Service website (www.nps.gov) has provided a few guidelines to help us understand the classifications:

“–Generally, a national park contains a variety of resources and encompasses large land or water areas to help provide adequate protection of the resources.

–A national monument is intended to preserve at least one nationally significant resource. It is usually smaller than a national park and lacks its diversity of attractions.

–In 1974, Big Cypress and Big Thicket were authorized as the first national preserves. This category is established primarily for the protection of certain resources. Preserving shoreline areas and offshore islands, the national lakeshores and national seashores focus on the preservation of natural values while at the same time providing water-oriented recreation.

–National rivers and wild and scenic riverways preserve freeflowing streams and their immediate environment with at least one outstandingly remarkable natural, cultural, or recreational value.

–National scenic trails are generally long distance footpaths winding through areas of natural beauty. National historic trails recognize original trails or routes of travel of national historical significance.

            Although best known for its great scenic parks, over half the areas of the National Park System preserve places and commemorate persons, events, and activities important in the  nation’s history.  

            –In recent years, national historic site has been the title most commonly applied by Congress in authorizing the addition of such areas to the National Park System. A wide variety of titles—national military park, national battlefield park, national battlefield site, and national battlefield—has been used for areas associated with American military history.  

            –The title national memorial is most often used for areas that are primarily commemorative.”

So there you have it…just goes to show you that the NPS is involved in so many ways of preservation, education and recreation for many visitors at a diversity of sites. Another reason, the park or monument designations are so important is because policies, funding legislation and land usage can and ARE profoundly affected by the designation.  For more commentary how that is currently affecting the parks in the recent administration, see my blog entitled: “Parks and Politics: Trying (so very hard) to keep politics out of the discussion.”  Published 12/5/2017Link:https://travelingamericablog.com/2017/12/05/parks-politics-trying-so-very-hard-to-keep-politics-out-of-the-discussion/

So look for that arrowhead in your travels and Put your traveling shoes on. JES

 

 

The Diversity of the Apostle Islands

“Sea stack” in the Apostle Islands

Sea Caves, Lighthouses, Shipwrecks and breathtaking Sunsets…..all these amazing attributes are found among the 22 islands above the northern tip of Wisconsin in the chilly waters of Lake Superior. These unique islands were sculpted out of sandstone and formed towards the end of the glacial period 10,000 years ago. The amazing colored agates and rocks found in the area were deposited as the glaciers melted.

Many stories surround how the Apostle Islands got their names, but the commonly agreed upon one, involves the biblical parallel to the 12 Apostles.  Early explorers to the area were missionaries and tended to name new areas based on Biblical names. Counting the islands loosely, many believed that there were only 12, so the name: the Twelve Apostle Islands seemed appropriate.  Even though there are 22, the name Apostle Islands remained.

It’s interesting that there are only four areas protected by the National Park Service as “national lakeshores” and the Apostle Islands is one of them. President Nixon signed the bill establishing the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in 1970. There are 22 islands in the Apostle Islands, but one is omitted from the inclusion in the National Park protection: Madeline Island. This island is the largest of the islands and was omitted due to extensive residential and commercial development already existing on the island.

NPS Visitors Center

When visiting a National Park, my mantra has always been: “Let’s go to the Visitor’s Center first!” A visit to these islands is no exception to that rule. The Visitors Center is in an old courthouse; a historic building in it’s own right, but gives you a real overview of the islands and any information you my need while visiting.  The Visitors Center Park Headquarters is found at 415 Washington Ave. in Bayfield,  north from WI. 13 near 5th street. It resides in an old courthouse building that has been beautifully restored.  It was constructed from Brownstone mined from the Apostle Islands. Inside the center, are numerous displays of historical and also present day features of the park. The folks that work at the information desk have an abundance of information to help with any questions and suggestions about the surrounding area and lakeshore.  There is also a terrific film, 20 minutes long, explaining both the geology and human history of the area surrounding the Apostles entitled: “On the edge of Gichi Gami, Voices of the Apostle Islands.” Most people are familiar with Longfellow’s spelling of Gitche Gumee from his Hiawatha poem (1855). However, today in Ojibwe language class, you are more likely to see gichi-gami, gitchi-gami or kitchi-gami for Lake Superior. Loosely, it does indeed mean “Big Sea” or “Huge Water,” but just about always refers to Lake Superior.

Bayfield Wisconsin is a lovely town right on the south shore of Lake Superior and hails itself as the gateway to the Apostle Islands. Bayfield is the smallest incorporated city in Wisconsin, but it is brimming over with activity near the beauty of Lake Superior and the surrounding hillsides. The area is known for an abundance of recreational pursuits like hiking, kayaking and of course sailing.  When we were there, the town was host to a sailing race. Many of the sailing teams congregating at the local restaurants…you could just tell by the snippets of overheard conversations. Some of the sailing terminology that was bantered about is completely foreign to me, but the great thing is you could tell they were having a terrific time sailing among these beautiful islands.  Also, fruit and apple crops are abundant in this climate and area restaurants highlight locally grown produce. The Bayfield Apple Festival, always starting on the first Friday in October, is a weekend filled with farmers markets, fish fry and culminating with a parade. It’s quite the event in Bayfield. For more info. about Bayfield, check out: http://Bayfield.org

Lights of the Apostle Islands

Having an interest in lighthouses, I really came to the right place: The Apostle Islands National Lakeshore has a larger concentration of lighthouses than any other National Park Service site. There are six lighthouses within the Apostle Islands, but there are even more in that area of Lake Superior, including Ashland Harbor. On the map here, you can see how the lighthouses are positioned among the islands. We only viewed the Raspberry and Devil’s Island lights, so perhaps another trip would be warranted.  After speaking with boat tour personnel and others, I found out that those two lighthouses are perhaps the most photographed and visited of all the lights.  Perhaps due in part to their easier accessibility to the mainland, but they are also possess their own unique characteristics. The building of the lighthouses between 1857 and 1915 ushered in the rise of modern shipping on Lake Superior.

Devil’s Island

Devil’s Island light opened in 1901 and sits atop the island that is the northernmost point of land in Wisconsin. I thought that alone was an interesting bit of trivia! This lighthouse is an impressive 80 feet high and is found above the beautiful sea caves that undercut the shoreline. The sandstone cliffs make a picturesque view with hardwood forests as the back drop. The incredibly rocky and treacherous shorelines, especially by Devil’s Island, make one realize why the lighthouses marking the way were so very important to the early mariners.

Raspberry Island Lighthouse

The Raspberry Island Lighthouse opened in 1862 with a height of 42 feet. The light was installed to mark the west channel in the islands. It is said to be one of the few remaining wood framed lighthouses on Lake Superior. Even though it is rather large, by lighthouses standards, it has a certain charm to it and has been lovingly restored in recent years. The property includes the attached lighthouse keeper quarters, a fog signal building, barn, brick oil house, two boathouses, two outhouses and a dock. When we were there, we saw a few people ascending the huge staircase from the shoreline and dock to the top landing: wow there’s your workout for the day.

There is so much beauty in the Apostle Islands to experience that one visit there will not suffice…looking forward to my next trip there. Put your traveling shoes on. JES

“Dear Bob and Sue” : A Fresh & Fun perspective on the NPS

If you love the beauty and diversity of our beautiful national parks the way I do…then have I got a great read for you! It’s called: Dear Bob and Sue- One couple’s journey through the national parks, By Matt & Karen Smith. I just recently finished reading it and was delighted with how much I enjoyed it.  They provide such fun insights and information about our national parks, but also so many great stories that make the reader literally laugh out loud. In addition to the adventures, they also include interesting and historical information that really enhances a visit to the parks; interesting without presenting like a boring text book. I really enjoyed reading about the parks I have already been to, then it was great also having the opportunity to find out more on the parks my husband and I hope to visit.

I see myself in the pages of this book and laugh when I see some of the authors behaviors mirrored as my own, especially when it comes to my great interest (or as my family would say: obsession) with the national parks. One of these parallels is my collecting from each and every park I have been to in the NPS the Visitor’s Guide, trail maps, newsletters, etc. Some I scrapbook with my photos, some I just save. Well, in the book Matt has the same idea and a meticulous filing system for each national park.  Good for him! I salute those organizational efforts. In the book, read the hilarious conversation on page 114 about the propensity for saving all those great brochures. I hear you Matt. Another regular habit of park goers, that Matt and Karen regularly adhered to, is the importance of having your PASSPORT to Your National Parks stamped. I didn’t purchase my Passport until after I had already visited several parks. In the interest of documenting ALL the parks I had visited, I went back and filled in the dates with a make shift “logo” of the park. Not the official “stamp”, but at least I documented that I was there. I know….kind of obsessive. Yet, a fun remembrance of my travels.

Even though this book provides information on the national parks, it is not meant to be perceived as a guide book, but rather as collection of stories about the discoveries and beauty awaiting travelers to the national parks. I would highly recommend it and it can easily be found on Amazon.   If you have the pleasure of reading this, I would be interested in your feedback here on my blog. Happy travels! JES

 

San Diego Sunshine

San Diego Harbor

The weathermen in San Diego are pretty much bored. It is the same old song every day: “Sunny and 70, Folks”. Out of the 365 days of the calendar year, San Diego’s average temperature is 63 degrees with 266 sunny days per year. Yet, that is such a lovely kind of boredom…and oh so pleasant. No wonder San Diego is such an intriguing tourist destination and the weathermen have such great job security; they are correct almost every day. The sun and surf are terrific, but you don’t have to be a sun-worshiper to enjoy all the sights and activities that this California city has to offer. An addition to enjoying the beautiful ocean views and beach, there are also many “must-sees” in the city itself.

Old Town Trolley Tours

My oldest son moved there several years ago, so I have been to visit this city many times and have favorites sights that I love to return to time and again. If you are just becoming introduced to the city, a great place to start is the Old Time Trolley Tours. They take you to 10 different stops throughout the city including: Balboa Park, San Diego Zoo, the famous Hotel Del Coronado, the Maritime ship museum on the waterfront and many more. The trolleys have a “Hop on, Hop off” system that allow you to see what you want and visit your preferred sites at your leisure. In addition to getting a great overview of some of the key sights in the city, the trolley drivers share a multitude of interesting historical info and trivia.  Did you know that San Diego is actually the “Birthplace of California”. In June of 1769, the first Spanish presidio and mission was established by the San Diego River making it the oldest European settlement on the west coast of the U.S. In tribute to the rich history of San Diego, it’s very fitting that the Trolley Tours would be based out of Old Town. Established today as Old Town San Diego, the site commemorates life in San Diego from 1821 to 1872. It includes shopping, restaurants,museums and the logical start for the trolley tours. You can purchase tickets at any of the 10 stops, but Old Town is the main facility and the starting and ending point for the tours.

Being so close to the emerald waters of the beautiful Pacific, when in San Diego one must really check out several of the beaches there. Coronado, by the infamous Hotel Coronado, is one of the most scenic, pristine beaches in the area. Mission Beach and Oceanside Beach are loved and frequented by both locals and tourists. Of course shops for beach gear and souvenirs are readily found at both.

Brown Pelican~ San Diego Harbor

If the beach scene isn’t quite your thing, you can still enjoy the Pacific with the many day cruises available. Depending on the time of year, a whale watching tour can be an excellent choice because from December thru the beginning of March, the whale migration patterns skirt the San Diego coastline. I recently took a 4 hour whale watching tour with great success: we saw several whales breech. In addition to the grey whales we spotted an abundance of other sea life including dolphins, sea lions, pelicans and cormorants. My bird watching senses were on full alert. It’s hard to capture in a photograph a grey whale breeching, but it is easy to see and photograph the brown pelicans flying around. At first glance they seem like awkward creatures, but in flight they are rather majestic. It is also truly amazing how big some of them get. For more information on the whale watching tour, you can check out their web site at: http://www.flagshipsd.com

Cabrillo National Monument

Having a passion for our National Parks, I would be remiss if I did not mention San Diego’s National Park site: The Cabrillo National Monument.  It celebrates the natural and cultural history of the area.  Juan Rodriquez Cabrillo  was the first Eurpoean, in 1542,  to set foot on a “very good enclosed port”.  In addition to telling the story about the 16th century exploration, a visitor can take in a terrific  view of the Pacific from Point Loma, and also a lighthouse is on the premises. The Point Loma Lighthouse was originally built in 1855.  It ceased operation in 1891, but is open to the public today as a museum.  It may be a small, seemingly insignificant lighthouse, but it has many interesting stories behind it. During the time of its operation, it was at the highest elevation of any lighthouse in the United States. (Impressive!)

 

The California Tower and the Museum of Man~ Balboa Park

So I saved my very favorite feature of San Diego for last: Balboa Park.  It holds the title as the nation’s largest urban cultural park. Every single time I go, it never fails to amaze and awe me. Bird of Paradise flowers, exotic trees, jeweled mosaics in the architectures, fountains and of course an array of interesting people to watch. In addition to the natural beauty found in the park, there are 17 museums. The museums have something for everyone from art and photography to anthropology, aerospace and even a model railroad museum for all the train buffs out there! Also, within the park boundaries is the world famous San Diego Zoo. It is hard to spend only one day at Balboa Park to try to take it all in. I have been there several times, and every time I go there are new surprises and delights.

 

So, San Diego is highly recommended as a travel destination. Remember that travel and tourism is San Diego’s third top industry (behind manufacturing and the military) So they want you to have a great time. Put your traveling shoes on. JES

Parks & Politics: Trying (so very hard) to keep politics out of the discussion.

 

I love our National Parks and am a strong supporter of keeping the beauty and sanctity of our most treasured natural spaces. I travel to the Parks, I research the Parks and I blog about the Parks. I have wanted my discussions and observations to be encouraging and support our National Park Service and perhaps encourage others to enjoy and appreciate our Parks.  Up to this point I have done that and will continue to do so, however in light of recent developments with the current federal administration I can no longer keep silent. I really don’t want my blog to be about politics, but if you discuss the National Park Service you can’t avoid talking about the federal government because after all, it is managed as a branch of the federal government. In 2016, the National Park Service celebrated their centennial: celebrating 100 years of the establishment and development of a world renowned system. A system that highlights the beauty of our Parks and assures the appreciation of such for generations to come.  Yet now, so many of these lands are being threatened by persons that want to exploit the land for monetary gain.  Sadly, it would be a gain that would not last and would forever destroy the beauty of the lands that were set aside for preservation.

It started as a shell game by a magician (Donald Trump) who graciously donated $78K of his own salary to the National Park Service.  On the surface this may seem as a good will gesture, but it pales in comparison to the amount of money he proposes cutting from the Department of the Interior, which operates the National Park Service and other agencies.  Money magazine reported that the President’s proposed budget would cut $1.5 billion from the Department of the Interior.  Of course it is not just money we are discussing, it’s also the irreparable harm that could befall our parks if some of the mind set of the current administration is allowed to proceed with “raping and pillaging” of our most breathtaking, sacred lands.

Let me give you just one consideration, just the tip of the iceberg, that I do consider “raping and pillaging” of one of our most beautiful National Parks: The Grand Canyon. The Trump administration is currently considering a review of the ban on uranium mining in the watershed of the Grand Canyon. The ban was originally put into place by President Barack Obama because of concerns of not only destroying the beauty of the canyon, but also the danger of polluting the Colorado River. I absolutely cringe at the idea of this and hope and pray that this will not come to fruition.

Bears Ears National Monument in Utah/ photo from PBS.org

I was prompted to write this by news that surfaced just Monday from the Trump administration.  Two federal national monuments in Utah were drastically reduced in size, making it reportedly the largest rollback of federal land protection in the nation’s history. Bear Ears National Monument was reduced by 85% and the Grand Staircase-Escalante was reduced to about half it’s size.   The current administration presents these changes as a need to put more of the land use to local and state controls, out of operation of federal control.  In theory that may sound like a good plan, but what types of land use could occur on unprotected lands?  More mining, more logging, more gas extraction?  Once land has been stripped of it’s beauty, it does not recuperate overnight. Is the Administration really taking into account what the local residents want?

Teddy Roosevelt and John Muir at Yosemite

President Trump may not even have the legal right to pursue revising the status of certain public lands that were established under the Antiquities Act.   Trump’s legal authority to make these changes is already being challenged with the filing of several law suits against these actions.  The Antiquities Act was signed into law in 1906 by President Theodore Roosevelt. It authorizes the President to protect landmarks, structures and objects of historic or scientific interest by designating them as National Monuments. Herein lies a problem with the verbiage that gets “tricky”. First of all the distinction between a National Park and a National Monument causes problems with the dos and don’t with land usage.  For example, some of the lands that are considered monuments, already have certain mining within the territory, whereas you would not see that happening in a National Park.  Second, Park preservation varies from President to President and what one may deem important, the other may choose to rescind.  IF there is a legal way around it. I don’t know how much of the Antiquities Act has to be adhered to, I just know that the Trump administration is really pushing the envelope on this.  He’s messing with it. I know that legislation can become outdated and frequently needs to be revised…but not this one.  I will bet you that Teddy Roosevelt and John Muir are rolling in their graves thinking of what is even being considered in our most beautiful parts of the country.

I don’t profess to be an expert and I don’t know all the ins and outs of pending legislation, but I want to have a voice. I don’t want to be “afraid” to speak up. I want to voice my thoughts on one of my true passions: the beauty and sanctity of one of America’s greatest treasure: Our National Parks. May we all continue to protect and preserve them. Put your traveling shoes on.  JES