Category Archives: East

Boston Blend

Paul Revere statue by the Old North Church

 

Boston is a city that stands as a shining example of the blending of old and new elements. Boston is steeped with history showcasing the birth of our nation and the events of the American Revolution. Yet, in the same token it is a modern bustling city with glimmering skyscrapers next to the shores of the Atlantic. There is so much to take in when visiting this east coast city and there is something to appeal to every taste: history, architecture, diverse cuisine, beautiful parks and of course the famous Freedom Trail.

Red brick pathways of The Freedom Trail

Even if you have never been to Boston, the Freedom Trail is the most talked about and highlighted feature of the city.  The red brick pathways throughout the city streets lead you to 16 of some of the most significant events in the history of the United States. And yes, they happened in Boston.  Boston is frequently referred to as “The Cradle of Liberty”. The trail was originally conceived in 1951; the trail was completed and by 1953 40,000 people were walking the trail annually.  The trail is easy to follow by the narrow red bricks marking the way. The entire trail is only 2 1/2 miles long, but to take it all in perhaps its easier to walk part of the trail and “trolley” part of it. There are two trolley companies within the city that provide “hop on, hop off” service. I would highly recommend this, it’s an easy way to get around and see the sights you want to without becoming completed exhausted. They both have web sites and information on their tours: Old Town Trolley Tours and City View Trolley Tours.

One of the best places to start learning about all the ins and outs of the Freedom Trail is with the National Park Service. The NPS provides an abundance of information detailed the significant events of the birth of our nation. The National Park Service has two Visitor’s Centers in Boston: one in Faneuil Hall in the heart of government center area and the other by the harbor and the USS Constitution. We went to both Centers and both facilities offer an abundance of information to gain a better understanding of the historical significance of all the sites along the Freedom Trail. For those of you who are NPS passport holders, like myself, I am thrilled to report there are 16 different stamps you can collect from all the historic sites. I didn’t get all of them, but added quite a few to expand my Passport collection.

Boston’s Quincy Market- Built 1826

In the heart of the city is a vibrant market place housed in both Faneil Hall and Quincy Market. Faneil Hall was built in 1742 to serve as a central market but town meetings were also held here from 1764 to 1774. Samuel Adams led meetings here with protests against the taxation of the colonies, when some of the first stirrings of a revolution began. Today Faneuil Hall contains shops and restaurants on the first floor, the NPS Visitor’s Centers on the second floor and a museum on the third floor. The museum contains a collection about the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts. The Company was founded in 1638 for defense of the colony. The display has occupied space in Faneuil Hall since 1746.

“In Boston, we love Lobsta”

In the same courtyard as Faneil Hall stands the stately building with Greek columns: Quincy Market. It was named after the Mayor of that time period (1823) who pushed to have the marketplace built to accommodate the needs of the growing city and the overcrowding at Faneuil Hall. Quincy Market was completed in 1826. It is a fascinating place to visit with all the sights and sounds of a thriving marketplace. Fish, meat, cheeses and an abundance of produce are seen up and down each aisle displayed by a diversity of vendors. Not only is this harbor town known for their wonderful seafood, but Bostonians have a unique accent and are not shy about it. Just take a look at this sign at a seafood vendor I saw at Quincy Market, it really gave me a chuckle. The way to pronounce Lobster is to drop the R….Lobsta…that’s the Boston way. I love it. We enjoyed talking with the locals and their accent was very evident with the trolley drivers. Perhaps they ham it up a bit for the tourists. I know that our Mid-western accents sound quite odd to them. That is always a fun part of traveling about the country. It’s English, but there are just so many different ways to speak it. Additionally, in this same marketplace, there are two additional buildings: South Market and North Market. Wow….So much shopping, So little time.

USS Constitution-oldest ship in the Navy

One of the highlights on the Freedom Trail takes you to the Charlestown Navy Yard; where the Charles River meets Boston Harbor. Here sitting in the harbor, is the oldest commissioned U.S. Naval ship: the USS Constitution.  She really is quite a sight to behold, and looking at all the rigging on her sails, it’s hard to imagine all the sailors operating them without tripping over each other. It would definitely have to be an orchestrated effort. The ship was built by Bostonians and launched in 1797. She sailed in 40 battles and never lost one. She was nicknamed “Old Ironsides” because of the way cannonballs would bounce off her tough oak planking. When visiting this sight, you are allowed to walk on the ship and explore it. However, security is tight because part of the facility is a working Navy base, it’s not all for tourism. The museum on the premises is also very interesting, it’s hard to take in all the information at one time, perhaps warrants multiple trips.

Swan Boat in Boston Common

The oldest public park in America, the Boston Common, is in the heart of the city and provides lush green spaces, manicured walkways trimmed with flowers, a small “frog pond” and a larger lake. It was originally  established by the Puritans in 1634. Within the park is a beautiful pond with the infamous Swan Boats floating gracefully across the pond. The boats are as quiet and gently moving as a real swan, because there are no motors; powered only by peddling of the swan boat “captain”. Even when filled with people, the whole park is serene and a lovely place to relax on a blanket on the grass.

“Make Way For Ducklings”

Another charming aspect of the park is the adorable “Make Way for Ducklings” statue that pays homage to the classic children’s story by Robert McCloskey. The tale of the wayward ducklings was inspired by the busy streets of Boston and a Mama Mallard trying to protect her brood. It was originally published in 1941, but it’s continued popularity has held the test of time as a classic children’s story.

Crossing the bridge on the Charles River, from Boston to Cambridge, takes you to two of the most prestigious institutions of higher learning in America: Harvard University and MIT. Harvard holds the title of the oldest college in America, it was founded in 1636. Today Harvard also is known as a leading research facility.  The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) was founded in 1861 and has become one of the world’s leading technical institutions.

Boston is indeed a city of manyfirsts” in our county. The first printing press was in Boston in 1638. The first subway was in Boston, 1898. The first World Series was held in Boston, 1903. The last “first” I will mention is near and dear to my heart: The Boston Light was the country’s first lighthouse in 1716. How could I have missed that when I was there….sounds like I need to head back to Boston for my OWN photo of that iconic lighthouse. Put your traveling shoes on. Julie E. Smith

The Boston Light-America’s first: 1716

The Sun Rises first at Acadia

Cadillac Mountain–Acadia National Park

On the eastern most point of the Maine coastline, atop Cadillac Mountain, is one of the places where dawn first touches the continental United States. The 1,530 foot mountain is found within Acadia National Park, established in 1919 as the first  National Park east of the Mississippi.  (Yellowstone N.P. holds the title of the first Park in the U.S.-1872)  Acadia is truly a gem on the east coast, a showcase on the Atlantic seashore that Maine residents feel such pride in sharing  with visitors to this mountainous part of the state. The park is composed of most of Mount Desert Island and tracts of land on the Schoodic Peninsula and Isle au Haut.

When my family and I visited there, that Maine hospitality and pride of their state is very apparent. My husband’s uncle has lived in Maine all his life.  He was so delighted to show us around Acadia and the nearby tourist town of Bar Harbor.  Being from the Midwest, I pronounced it with the “Rs”.  A true Maine local would say “Bah Habaw”. I probably don’t have a correct phonetic pronunciation, but you get the idea…they drop their Rs. On that trip it was a never-ending source of amusement: our Uncle and cousins laughed at the weird sound of our “Chicaawgo” accent and we laughed about Bah Habaw. Bar Harbor is Maine’s best-known tourist town, with most of Mount Desert Island’s motels, restaurants and shops located there.  As you can see on this map, Bar Harbor is right on the coast with a stunning view of the Atlantic, but is just outside the perimeter of the Park.  In addition to tourism, Maine is known for being the leader in the Lobster industry. Looking out at the water I remember seeing all the little white dots on the water and then realized that they were buoys designating where the lobster traps were set. A lobster feast in Maine is a must-do while traveling there. The map also identifies many of the incredible features of Acadia including the carriage roads.

Waiting on the next wave to come in…. Thunder Hole

Acadia is a stunning example of a beautiful plot of forested land where the mountains meet the sea. Last year, more than 3.5 million people visited Acadia National Park. Yet don’t think for a moment that it feels crowded…the 49,600 acre park affords amble opportunities to stretch your legs and take in the landscapes surrounding you. Although it is considered one of the smaller National Parks, it ranks among one of the most visited. Taking in the scenery is easy by either car or traversing the 125 miles of hiking trails. The Park Loop Road provides a wonderful sightseeing jaunt trough the park. It takes you to Sand Beach, Otter cliffs (a favorite rock climbing spot) and Thunder Hole.  At Thunder Hole, the Atlantic waves crash into a narrow chasm with such force that they create a thundering boom. When we went there, my sons were captivated, and impressed by the power of the ocean waves. Depending on the surf, and time of day, the waves rushing in can sometimes create a huge thunder effect and spray water 30 feet into the air.

One of the major attractions of Acadia is Cadillac Mountain. It is the highest peak in the eastern United States. Reaching the peak by car, is easy from a 3 1/2 mile spur off the Park Loop Road. There are also several hiking trails that end up on the mountain.  The view from the top is a fantastic one including the ocean and surrounding islands.  Any time of day is beautiful, but a few brave souls take the opportunity to see the first rays of sunlight as it hits the continental shore.

One of the stone bridges on the Carriage Roads Acadia National Park

One of the unique features of the Park are the carriage roads. From 1915 to 1940 John D. Rockefeller financed, designed and directed the construction of the carriage roads. The roads provided access to the park by horse-drawn carriages and were banned for usage by automobiles. The carriage roads still prohibit automobiles and are treasured by hikers, bikers and horseback riders. The roads include 17 hand-built granite bridges, each a beautiful addition to your travel throughout the park. The preservation of the carriage roads is also a unique tribute to John D. Rockefeller, as he was the one that donated land to the National Park Service to provide for establishment of the Park.

Bass Harbor Lighthouse

Being the lighthouse lover that I am, I would be remiss if I did not mention one of the most photographed lighthouses that happens to be in the Park at the southern most tip of Mount Desert Island: Bass Harbor Light. It sits atop a perilous looking cliff and the tower height itself is 32 feet; relatively short for lighthouse standards but it’s light extends far out into the Atlantic. The lighthouse was built in 1858, and became fully automated in 1974. Probably one of the most photographed because of its location on a majestic pine-covered cliff overlooking fantastic sunsets on the Atlantic. Definitely photo worthy.

 Acadia National Park is New England’s only National Park and a beautiful Park preserving the forested  lands and the rugged cliffs of the Atlantic seaboard. For more information you can contact: http://acadiamagic.com or the National Park Service site information at: www.nps.gov/acad/index.htm