The Conservation President

Theodore_Roosevelt_High_School,_DSM,_IA

TRHS-Des Moines, Iowa

I think it must have been fate that I graduated from Theodore Roosevelt High School. Little did I know that later in life I would develop such admiration for this man.  He really did so much for conservation and along with John Muir helped to create the National Park Service.  Since I am currently working on a book about National Parks and all the fantastic sites operated by the National Park Service…Teddy’s name just keeps popping up. That and John Muir. Come to find out John Muir is from Wisconsin….Nifty. But that’s a story for another day. Since Roosevelt had such an impact with conservation and the establishment of the National Park Service, I continue to find him an intriguing man in history. He is so much more than just some dude who’s likeness is carved into Mt. Rushmore.

I have been reading this terrific book about Roosevelt, but it’s not something you just sit and read cover to cover. Easier to digest when you peruse it and bounce back and forth through the chapters. It’s 940 pages long…but really interesting. Entitled:“The Wilderness Warrior, Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade For America” by Douglas Brinkley. (available on Amazon if you’re interested) It is a book that has so much detailed historical information, yet it also has details about the President as a person and helps you get to know many of Roosevelt’s little idiosyncrasies.  Things that really bring him to life, not just facts and figures but illustrations that show he was a man with both passions and prejudices. For example, I never knew that he was an avid bird watcher, cool… so am I. We would have so much to talk about.

An ice breaker question to ask is :“Who would you like to have dinner with, alive or dead?” At least one of the responses I would give to that question would be our 26th President: Theodore Roosevelt. In reading this book it is a reminder that even then, politics were, well….”politics” . TR had several adversaries that were on opposite sides of his agendas and I am sure he even had so-called enemies. Considering today’s political climate, it probably seemed mild to what we are trying to cope with now as Americans. In any case, Roosevelt persevered on several topics and was able to formulate several plans and enact legislation for conservation and preservation of our country’s valuable resources.

When my husband and I were heading west to visit Glacier N.P., we stopped in North Dakota and paid a visit to Theodore Roosevelt National Park. This area of the country is often considered the “Badlands of the North” evidenced by the rugged terrain, sedimentary rocks and prairie grasses. Occasionally you see small trees or shrubs popping up but mostly it is a rugged landscape with grasses and rocks. It was an interesting park to visit, even though it was devoid of majestic mountains and towering pines; things that people think are synonymous with a national park.  The quiet beauty here made you realize why Roosevelt choose this place as a refuge and a place to “re-fuel” his spirits.  At this Park, there is an on-site museum detailing Roosevelt’s life: both professionally and personally.  I was very saddened to find out that both his wife and his mother died hours apart on the same day: Valentine’s Day, 1884.  I can’t imagine how devastating that would have been. He found comfort and solace in this part of the country. His time here allowed him to grow and strengthen, both mentally and physically.  He was quoted as saying: “I have always said I would not have been President had it not been for my experience in North Dakota”.

So it’s no wonder they choose North Dakota as the site for Theodore Roosevelt National Park. It was a place that meant so much to him. Not only does it protect this unique area of land, it pays a wonderful tribute to a man who is remembered fondly as “The Conservation President.” I think I will vote for TR come November.

 

 

 

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