Grand Daddy Yellowstone

Falls at Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

Established in 1872 as the first National Park in America, Yellowstone is the Grand Daddy of our national parks. It is interesting to note that not only is it the first in America, it is the first National Park in the world. It is good to be known as a trendsetter for something like this….setting aside land for conservation, recreation and preservation for future generations. It is an amazing place to visit not only for the historical significance, but the diversity in the features of the park. Yellowstone is quite a popular destination: it hosted 4.12 million visitors in 2018. That sounds like alot…but it is a huge park, plus it is not all summertime attendance. Some  folks visit for winter adventures, but the most popular times are July and August.  A visit to Yellowstone provides a variety of experiences to make it well worth the trip. Included in that list of things to see at the park include: erupting geysers, bubbling hot springs, prismatic reflecting pools, waterfalls and an abundance of readily visible wildlife. All these amazing features are found within this large park of  3,472 square miles.  For some perspective, that’s more than three times the size of Rhode Island.

Old Faithful…just like clockwork.

Probably one of the most fondly known features of the part is Old Faithful geyser. Like clockwork, it erupts about every 90 minutes. Old Faithful and the many geysers and hot springs serve as a reminder of the unstable nature and changing geology of our planet: especially near Yellowstone.  Also near Old Faithful is a terrific Visitor Information center with all kinds of nifty information about the geyser basin region.

Grand Prismatic Spring (photo:trendbuzzer.com)

Just north of Old Faithful are the beautiful prismatic springs and waterfalls. A boardwalk stroll through the various springs gives you a nice view and it’s beneficial to try several different viewpoints. One of the most amazing and colorful is the Grand Prismatic Spring. It is the largest in the Park: at 370 feet wide, and stunning to view. The bright colors are caused by different types of bacteria and algae that thrive with the different water temperatures. One has to try several different angles before viewing, and photographing, all the spectacular colors.  If you have a drone for aerial views…this would be an awesome place to try it out.

Woodland critters @ the Park: to this day I’m not exactly sure what these fellows were, badgers?

The wildlife are so accustomed to park visitors; frequently they wander close enough so you can get some awesome photos.  Of course that has been known to cause problems, if you don’t respect their space and use common sense. They are wild animals after all.  When we were near one of the visitor’s centers, there was a very large heard of Elk that decided to hang out and take an afternoon siesta under the shade of a spreading Oak. They are beautiful graceful creatures and several were mothers with young ones to protect. Photos could easily be taken from a safe distance. Several rangers had carefully arranged some barricades by the sidewalk directly across from the Elk….to keep both the tourists and the Elks safe. As you can image, “there’s one in every crowd” : some idiot walked over the barricade with camera in hand trying to get much closer for a “great shot.” Luckily he did not get too far before the ranger called out to him. Apparently, he felt he was exempt from following the guidelines put in place by the Park…he just ignored the ranger and kept walking closer. He waved off the ranger who then, justifiably so, got angry. Nevertheless, the ranger’s professionalism and manner in handling this incident was incredible. He “hit” him (the inconsiderate tourist) where it hurts: his wallet. The ranger firmly said that if he did not step away he would fine the man $500 for not adhering to Park regulations and disobeying the instructions of a Park Ranger. The Elk photographer did back down and I am sure the ranger was relieved that no further action was necessary. The rangers are there just to protect the beauty and sanctity of the Park, the Park wildlife and to assist visitors in the Park to have a wonderful Park experience.  I give all those rangers so much credit; they do incredible work. I have never met a ranger I didn’t like: they are all so incredibly helpful and they have a wealth of information about the Parks they serve. Never be afraid to ask questions, they are happy to help!

“Bison Jam” @ Yellowstone

On a lighter note about wildlife viewing is a critter you are almost destined to see: the Bison.  Yellowstone is famous for its roaming herds of bison.  Like many visitors to Yellowstone we were wondering: “What’s the difference between a buffalo and a bison?” We wanted to make sure we used the right verbage for theses amazing, massive creatures that you see frequently all around the Park. Actually bison are the creatures found roaming the American west, not buffalo. Varieties of buffalo are found in South Asia and Africa.  A major difference is the presence of a hump. Bison have one at the shoulders while buffalo don’t.  Buffalo’s horns tend to be quite long, bison’s horn are shorter. Even with all these differences, it’s easy to get mixed up and call them buffalo. Common usage I guess from all those old cowboy Western movies. In Yellowstone, a frequent occurrence on the road ways is the Bison Jam. Bison, of course, have the right of way and when they want to cross the road, you better let them….at their own pace. We had the excitement of seeing this first hand and you can get some great photos…safe photos…if you use caution and obviously stay in your vehicle.

Heading out west? Be sure to stop at the Grand Daddy of them all:Yellowstone National Park. Put your traveling shoes on. JES

Creek by the Shoshone Lodge, near East entrance to Yellowstone
The Author, Julie, at Yellowstone National Park

 

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One Comment on “Grand Daddy Yellowstone

  1. Very complete.  Are you happy with the commercials?  I printed it and will add it to your collection.  Why don’t I trust records on computers???    Love, Mom

    Like

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